Hawthorn Tree Pictures

Welcome to our hawthorn tree pictures page. On this page you will find lots of nice pictures of hawthorn trees.

Hawthorn Tree Facts

You will also find a lot of wonderful information on hawthorn trees, including information about the hawthorn tree species, planting information, and much more.

This is valuable and useful information that can help you to learn more about the hawthorn tree.

Hawthorn Tree Images

To view each hawthorn tree picture in full size just click on the photo you like.

Enjoy these pictures of the hawthorn tree.

Hawthorn Tree Photos Gallery

Hawthorn Tree
Hawthorn Tree
Hawthorn Tree
Hawthorn Tree Photo
Hawthorn Tree Photo
Hawthorn Tree Photo
Hawthorn Tree Picture
Hawthorn Tree Picture
Hawthorn Tree Picture
Hawthorn Tree Image
Old Hawthorn Tree Image
Hawthorn Tree Pic
Hawthorn Tree Picture
Hawthorn Trees
Hawthorn Trees

Hawthorn Trees 1 Hawthorn Trees 2

Hawthorn Trees, Facts & Detailed Information on the Hawthorn Tree

Crataegus, commonly called hawthorn or thornapple, is a large genus of shrubs and trees in the rose family, Rosaceae, native to temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere in Europe, Asia and North America. The White hawthorn (C. punctata) is the state flower of Missouri. The name hawthorn was originally applied to the species native to northern Europe, especially the Common Hawthorn C. monogyna, and the unmodified name is often so used in Britain and Ireland. However the name is now also applied to the entire genus, and also to the related Asian genus Rhaphiolepis.

Hawthorns provide food and shelter for many species of birds and mammals, and the flowers are important for many nectar-feeding insects. Hawthorns are also used as food plants by the larvae of a large number of Lepidoptera species; see List of Lepidoptera that feed on hawthorns. Haws are important for wildlife in winter, particularly thrushes and waxwings; these birds eat the haws and disperse the seeds in their droppings.

Although it is commonly stated that hawthorns can be propagated by cutting, this is difficult to achieve with rootless stem pieces. Small plants or suckers are often transplanted from the wild. Seeds require stratification and take one or two years to germinate. Seed germination is improved if the pyrenes that contain the seed are subjected to extensive drying at room temperature, before stratification. Uncommon forms can be grafted onto seedlings of other species.

The fruits of the species Crataegus pinnatifida (Chinese Hawthorn) are tart, bright red, and resemble small crabapple fruits. They are used to make many kinds of Chinese snacks, including haw flakes and tanghulu. The fruits are also used to produce jams, jellies, juices, alcoholic beverages, and other drinks. In South Korea, a liquor called sansachun is made from the fruits.

The fruits of Crataegus pubescens are known in Mexico as tejocotes and are eaten raw, cooked, or in jam during the winter months. They are stuffed in the piñatas broken during the traditional pre-Christmas celebration known as Las Posadas. They are also cooked with other fruits to prepare a Christmas punch. The mixture of tejocote paste, sugar, and chili powder produces a popular Mexican candy called rielitos, which is manufactured by several brands.

In the southern United States fruits of three native species are collectively known as mayhaws and are made into jellies which are considered a great delicacy. On Manitoulin Island in Canada, some red-fruited species are called hawberries. They are common there thanks to the island's distinctive alkaline soil. During the pioneer days, white settlers ate these fruits during the winter as the only remaining food supply. People born on the island are now called "haweaters".

In Iran, the fruits of Crataegus azarolus (var. aronia) are known as zalzalak and are eaten raw as a snack, or used as in a jam known by the same name.

The leaves are edible and, if picked in spring when still young, they are tender enough to be used in salads. Several species of hawthorn have been used in traditional medicine, and there is considerable interest in testing hawthorn products for evidence-based medicine.

Several pilot studies have assessed the ability of hawthorn to help improve exercise tolerance in people with NYHA class II cardiac insufficiency compared to placebo.
The wood of some hawthorn species is very hard and resistant to rot. In rural North America it was prized for use as tool handles and fence posts.

Hawthorn can also be used as a rootstock in the practice of grafting. It is graft-compatible with Mespilus (medlar), and with pear, and makes a hardier rootstock than quince, but the thorny suckering habit of the hawthorn can be problematic
The custom of employing the flowering branches for decorative purposes on the 1st of May is of very early origin; but since the adoption of the Gregorian calendar in 1752, the tree has rarely been in full bloom in England before the second week of that month. In the Scottish Highlands the flowers may be seen as late as the middle of June. The saying "Ne'er cast a cloot til Mey's oot" conveys a warning not to shed any cloots (clothes) before the summer has fully arrived and the may flowers (hawthorn blossoms) are in full bloom.

The hawthorn has been regarded as the emblem of hope, and its branches are stated to have been carried by the ancient Greeks in wedding processions, and to have been used by them to deck the altar of Hymenaios. The supposition that the tree was the source of Jesus's crown of thorns gave rise doubtless to the tradition current (as of 1911) among the French peasantry that it utters groans and cries on Good Friday, and probably also to the old popular superstition in Great Britain and Ireland that ill-luck attended the uprooting of hawthorns. Branches of Glastonbury Thorn, (C. monogyna 'Biflora', sometimes called C. oxyacantha var. praecox), which flowers both in December and in spring, were formerly highly valued in England, on account of the legend that the tree was originally the staff of Joseph of Arimathea

Impressive Tree Pictures

Collection of Impressive Tree Images

Autumn Fall Trees Images Bermuda Tree Photos
Christmas Tree Pictures Hibiscus Tree Flowers
Winter Tree Pictures Impressive Tree Pictures
Forest Tree Paths Photos Oak Tree Pictures
Cedar Trees Photos Pine Tree Pictures

Trees: Recent Tree Photos, Pics & Images

Tree Picture, Apple Tree Orchard Photo
Christmas Tree: Picture Photo of Xmas Trees
Maples: Sugar Maple Tree Leaf

Palm Tree Pictures

Beech Trees

Palm Trees

Tree Picture, Apple Tree Orchard Photo
Christmas Tree: Picture Photo of Xmas Trees
Maples: Sugar Maple Tree Leaf

Oak Tree Gallery

Christmas Trees

Maple Trees

Tree Picture, Apple Tree Orchard Photo
Tree Picture, Apple Fruit Tree Photo
Tree Pictures, Palm Trees Pic, Bermuda

Apple Tree Photo Gallery

Apple Tree Images

Palm Trees Gallery

Tree Picture, Identify Japanese Maple Tree Photo, Japanese Maples Tree Image
Tree Picture, Identify Scotch Pine Tree Photo, Pines Tree Images
Tree Picture, Identify Willow Tree Photo, Weeping Willow Tree Images

Japanese Maple Trees

Pine Tree Gallery

Willow Trees Category

Tree Pictures Online can be viewed in over 50 Languages

To view Tree Pictures Online tree categories in your preferred language choose the "Select Language" on the scroll down menu to your language ... then wait a moment and new Tree Pictures pages will appear. Enjoy these Tree Pictures.

EnglishFrenchGermanItalianPortugueseRussianSpanish

Tree wallpaper images can make beautiful backgrounds on your computer`s desktop. See our tree wallpaper photographs link in the left tree categories.

Thank you for visiting our Tree Pictures at TreePicture Online.com, please come back soon for more great tree photos!

Pictures Sites

Fireplace Pictures - Tree Pictures - Gazebo Pictures

Church Pictures Fall Pictures Manufactured Home Pictures
Log Siding Shadow Puppets Caribbean Islands

Play Touch Games Pictures of Winter Shadow Puppet Pictures Waterfall Pictures
Resume Samples Make Hot Pictures Job Application Forms

Tree Pictures